Circuit Board Repair Guide > Jumper Wires and Component Modification Procedures > 6.3 Guidelines for Component Modifications and Additions

Guidelines for Component Modifications and Additions

Repair Circuit Boards | Repair SMT Pads | Repair BGA Pads | Repair Lands | Repair Edge Contacts
Repair a Conductor | Plated Hole Repair | Base Board Repair | Replace Solder Mask or Coatings

This method covers the general guidelines for modifications that involve adding components.

Related Procedure References
CTC 2.1 Handling Electronic Assemblies
CTC 2.2.1 How to Clean a Circuit Board
CTC 2.2.2 Cleaning Circuit Boards, Aqueous Batch Process
CTC 2.5 Baking and Preheating of Printed Circuit Boards
CTC 2.7 Epoxy Mixing and Handling
CTC 6.1 How to Use Jumper Wires

Tools and Materials
Cleaner
Cleaning Wipes
Flux
Microscope
Soldering Station
Solder
 
Modifications that involve adding components
Component Modifications

Printed Board Type: R/F/W/C  |  Skill Level: Advanced  |  Conformance Level: N/A  |  Rev.: A  |  Rev. Date: Feb 1, 2001

General Rules

1.
Added components may need to be secured with adhesive, or by other means, if the component leads or component body would be subjected to mechanical stress.
2.
Leads of added components should not be inserted into plated holes occupied by another component lead.
3.
Added components placed on the circuit board surface should be placed on the component side of the assembly or circuit board unless otherwise specified.
4.
Added components shall not be raised above the board surface beyond allowable dimensions.
5.
Added components shall not cover over pads or vias used as test points.
6.
Added components shall not cover other component foot prints unless the layout of the assembly prohibits mounting in other areas.
7. Added component leads may require insulation to avoid contact with component body or other conductors.
8. Removal of existing solder from a connection point may be necessary to avoid bridging, or excess solder, in the final connection.
9.
Consider design limitations and product use environments when stacking components.
10.
Do not exceed minimum component lead bend radius.
11.
When possible, component identification marking shall be legible.

Procedure
   
1.
When required, form the component leads and clean the area.
2.
When required, secure the component in place by bending leads or other mechanical means.
3. Apply flux to the joint.
4.
Place the soldering iron tip at the connection between both leads. Apply a small amount of solder at the connection of soldering iron tip and lead to form a solder bridge.
5.
Immediately feed solder into the joint from the side opposite from the soldering iron tip until the proper fillet is achieved. Remove the solder and iron simultaneously.
6.
When required, clean the flux residue.
7.
Inspect.

Component Modifications and Additions Figures

Radial lead component soldered to through hole component leads
Figure 1 - Radial lead component soldered to through hole component leads.
Note: Leads of the radial component should not need to be inserted into the plated holes.


 
Axial lead component soldered to through hole component leads
Figure 2 - Axial lead component soldered to through hole component leads.
Note: Leads of axial component should not be inserted into the plated holes.


 
Axial lead component soldered to adjacent axial lead component
Figure 3 - Axial lead component soldered to adjacent axial lead component.
Note: Added component may be stacked vertically or horizontally.


Chip component soldered to surface mount component using jumper wires
Figure 4 - Chip component soldered to surface mount component using jumper wires.
Note: One lead of surface mount component is shown lifted.


 
DIP component stacked and soldered onto another DIP component
Figure 5 - DIP component stacked and soldered onto another DIP component. One lead shown clipped.
Note: Leads of added component should not be inserted into the plated holes.


 
Chip cap bridging adjacent leads
Figure 6 - Chip cap bridging adjacent leads.


Chip component bridging leads of surface mount component
Figure 7 - Chip component bridging leads of surface mount component.


 
Chip component stacked onto another chip component
Figure 8 - Chip component stacked onto another chip component.


 
Surface mount component mounted upside down
Figure 9 - Surface mount component mounted upside down with jumper wires attached.
Note: One lead is bent outward.


DIP component mounted upside down
Figure 10 - DIP Component mounted upside down with jumper wires attached.
 
Chip component mounted to one pad only
Figure 11 - Chip component mounted to one pad only.
 
Radial lead component mounted upside down
Figure 12 - Radial lead component mounted upside down.
Note: Insulate leads to avoid contact with component body.




Links to Related Products


Prototyping Boards for Through Hole and SMT Components  
Prototyping Boards for Through Hole and SMT Components
These Schmartboard prototyping boards support through hole and surface mount components. This is the fastest and easiest electronic circuit prototyping system ever conceived.

The SchmartBoard|ez products are for people who may not have advanced soldering skills, first-timers, or just anyone who wants to have a fast, easy, and hassle-free experience.



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